Restaurants/Bars

350. Andrews on the Corner – July 27, 2018 – Detroit, MI

July2018AndrewsOnTheCorner2 (3)On a recent guided tour of Detroit’s oldest bars, I frolicked at the Two-Way Inn, Abick’s, and Nancy Whiskey. The Two-Way Inn and Abick’s were new-to-me visits – and hence, they were new to 100 Places in the D (YAY!), while Nancy Whiskey was a revisit, as I first made the 116-year-old bar’s acquaintance during the 2017 Corktown 5K/parade shenanigans (though I was thrilled to experience the Irish pub’s patio during warm weather this time around!).

Then there was Andrews on the Corner, our final stop on the tour – and another new place for both me and the blog (YES!).

I was immediately intrigued by this riverfront-adjacent downtown bar when our tour guide mentioned that it’s historically been a hangout for Detroit Red Wings players and coaches. Our guide explained that both Scotty Bowman and Mike Babcock are said to have had beers at Andrews before coaching Stanley Cup finals matches, while a bartender on duty told me that Steve Yzerman (my childhood love!) once offered to buy the joint. Whether these tidbits are fact or fabricated lore, I loved learning them because I’m a big Wings fan – and how cool is it imagining championship teams holding court at Andrews?

At any rate, the family-run bar that’s currently in its centennial year (Happy 100th, Andrews!) is laden with framed photos of Wings players. It also features a food menu loaded with delectable-sounding sandwich and appetizer options, including poutine (YUM) and the compelling Hot and Spicy Mac n’ Cheese Bites (which feel like they leapt straight from my brain and onto that menu – I mean, cheese AND spice AND fried??? Yes, please!). And of course, Andrews offers a full bar, replete with local craft brews.

The visit to Andrews on the Corner concluded the guided tour of four of Detroit’s oldest bars – but I’m still mentally reveling in the experience and can’t wait to tour more of the ancient taverns currently in operation. If you’re a local or planning a visit to Detroit, I highly encourage you to check out all four of the enchanting, history-laden bars I hung out in during this tour – and any others that are calling to you. The city is definitely chock-full of charming watering holes, be they old or new!

201 Jos. Campau Ave.

Detroit, MI 48207

www.andrewsonthecorner.com

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349. Abick’s – July 27, 2018 – Detroit, MI

July2018Abicks1 (2)July2018Abicks3 (2)July2018Abicks2 (2)Abick’s is represented on 100 Places in the D!!!

All four of the oldest-of-the-old Detroit bars that I recently toured were AMAZING; Abick’s – the oldest family-run bar in continuous operation in Detroit – stands out as my favorite.

Located in a residential neighborhood of Southwest Detroit, the bar has long been a fixture of the community, having opened in 1907.

Step inside, and you’ll see why it’s lasted so long: the welcoming staff, homey, down-to-earth environs, and cheap drink prices are the perfect components of a classic neighborhood hangout – and let me not forget the solemn-eyed Mastiff hunkered down near the bar and compelling artifacts on display that highlight the establishment’s rich history.

Speaking of Abick’s lengthy and lasting life span, here’s an important component of it: according to the guide whose tour brought me to the bar, it has historically been a hangout for police officers and firefighters. This is highlighted by the existence of call boxes inside the bar – old-fashioned telephone boxes that back in the day enabled police and firefighter patrons to be in communication with their offices while they were frequenting Abick’s (how’s that for catering to one’s market?). Nowadays, the call boxes are locked (and, according to our guide, are storage lockers for high-end liquor).

The call box shown in the photo above is housed in a small room toward the back of Abick’s designated as a cigar lounge. Glass cases displaying a multitude of medals bestowed on the bar by police and firefighter clientele also adorn the walls of this room.

Further highlighting Abick’s rich history is a slideshow display in the main area of the bar recounting significant moments in its timeline and that of the Abick family. Tracing the evolution of both via the information presented there, it was wonderful to realize that Abick’s and the family who own and operate it have been supporting the community in various ways (offering free food to patrons during the Great Depression, for instance) for over 110 years! What better place to encapsulate the enduring spirit of Detroit than this one?

A final tidbit worth noting: Abick’s is a cash-only establishment (consider it another aspect that adds to its old-school appeal).

3500 Gilbert St.

Detroit, MI 48210

348. Two-Way Inn – July 27, 2018 – Detroit, MI

July20182-WayInn1 (2)July20182-WayInn2 (3)July20182-WayInn3 (4)The Friday before last, I toured some of Detroit’s oldest bars, and it was AWESOME.

When I say old bars, I mean OLD! Like, pre-Prohibition old! Detroit being one of the oldest cities in the country, it’s got a rich history, and that rich history includes grand ol’ watering holes, some of which have been in operation for a hundred years or more.

I’ve been dying to tour all of the oldest-of-the-old Detroit bars since I read an article highlighting them in Hour Detroit several years ago. I wanted to design a tour of those I hadn’t hit yet and attempted to one night in June. Plotting them on a map, I noticed the bars that interested me were scattered around the city and realized the endeavor would be logistically complex. So I did an internet search for guided tours of Detroit’s oldest bars, found one, and recruited friends along for the (bus) ride. Operation Antique Saloon Shenanigans was underway!

The experience they crafted being an absolute delight, I planned to give a glowing shout-out to the tour provider in this post – until I remembered that they prefer to keep the identities of the four bars visited on the tour a secret. Since I want to cover the bars that were new-to-me places here on 100 Places in the D but don’t want to overtly ruin the surprise of the tour, I’m going to keep the company’s identity anonymous. Just know that it’s great and that if you search “oldest bars in Detroit tour” online, you can pretty easily figure out its name and that of this entertaining, enlightening, downright fun tour.

On to today’s featured bar: the Two-Way Inn! It was our first stop on the tour and currently holds the distinction of being the oldest continuously running bar in Detroit, with an inauguration date of 1876.

1876! That’s a mere 11 years after the Civil War ended!

Guys, this place is LIIIIFFFEE. It’s got this gorgeous dark wooden bar that was paid for by Stroh’s in exchange for the promise to peddle its beer. It’s got a pool table and colored twinkle lights festooning the bar and an antique cigarette machine advertising a cost of five cents. The walls are studded with old photographs and deer antlers and an epic velvet painting of John Wayne. Basically, it’s got coziness and character for days and is saturated with history.

Speaking of history, here’s an interesting tidbit: according to our tour guide, the Two-Way Inn got its name from its two entrances and the habit its male patrons had of entering through the front door and exiting out the back. He explained that many wives of the patrons were angry that their husbands squandered their paychecks at the bar. When a wife suspected her husband was drinking at the Two-Way Inn, she’d show up at its front door looking for him. A lookout would identify the wife and alert her husband of her presence, and he’d roll out the back door before she saw him. Sneaky rascals! In present-day time, the front door is the sole door through which patrons can enter.

Another fun detail about the Two-Way Inn is that there’s a bell hanging above the bar that you should take care not to ring – unless you’re prepared to purchase a round of drinks for the house! We joked that the tallest guy in our tour should stand near the bell, increasing the odds of him inadvertently knocking it with his head and being forced to buy all of our beverages.

About 45 minutes were spent by our group at this glorious establishment (and at each of the other three bars we visited on the tour). We were the tavern’s sole patrons during that time – though a Pabst rep did pop in with hats, free PBR, and other swag, to the delight of the group. I sipped a Short’s Soft Parade, chatted with my friends, the tour guide, and others in our group of approximately 15, and crushed hard on this bar with 142 years of operation under its belt and counting. Two-Way Inn, I’m delighted to have made your acquaintance!

17897 Mt. Elliott St.

Detroit, MI 48212

www.2wayinn.com

347. M.C. ‘Wiches – July 27, 2018 – Ferndale, MI

July2018MCWiches1 (4)July2018MCWiches2 (2)The Friday before last, I was in downtown Ferndale, and I needed sustenance – hearty sustenance. Bread-and-cheese-and-meat-level sustenance. I scanned the downtown stretches of Woodward and Nine Mile, seeking somewhere to satisfy this requirement, and stumbled upon M.C. ‘Wiches sandwich shop.

After scanning its menu, I knew M.C. ‘Wiches was a place where I could stuff my face with a substantial, satisfying sandwich: specifically the seven-inch Cuban B ‘Wich. I got it on toasted wheat bread, opting to keep it simple when choosing from the various bread options, which included the intriguing Jalapeño Cheddar and a gluten-free variety. My sandwich was prepared promptly by the friendly young woman working the counter, and I settled in at one of ‘Wiches’ tables to devour it.

That Cuban B was a hefty sandwich indeed! Loaded with ham and pulled pork, pickle chunks and Swiss cheese, mustard and the signature ‘Wich Sauce (a garlic aioli), it most definitely satisfied my hunger – and was delicious while doing it.

While I found the seven-inch ‘Wich to be the perfect portion, I like that M.C. ‘Wiches offers two other sandwich sizes: the 3.5-inch Lil ‘Wich and the 14-inch Double ‘Wich. Its menu also includes two combo options that add a drink and a pickle to your ‘Wich as well as a side: depending on which one you go for, you can choose from chips, coleslaw, soup, mac-and-cheese, and baked goodies (including gluten-free varieties).

Bomb bread-and-cheese-and-meat-level sustenance offered by a friendly staff in a clean, pleasant environs: M.C. ‘Wiches is doing fast-casual right!

172 W. Nine Mile Rd.

Ferndale, MI 48220

(With an additional location in Oxford)

www.mcwiches.com

343. The Pita Peddler – June 27, 2018 – Chesterfield, MI

June2018PitaPeddler1 (2)Visiting a friend’s new home one evening in late June also meant new-place-time for the blog (YES!), as I stopped en route for carryout at The Pita Peddler, a Mediterranean restaurant in Chesterfield.

The Pita Peddler has dine-in seating, but it was all about carryout orders the Wednesday evening I was there. Carryout business was KICKING on that night! I sat and waited for our order at the counter of the sleek, fully-stocked bar, which according to my friend is a more recent addition.

After perusing The Pita Peddler’s extensive menu loaded with traditional Mediterranean appetizers and entrees as well as a variety of non-Mediterranean salads, pita melts, and pita wraps,  I’d opted for a Fattoush side salad and Chicken Shawarma pita wrap.

The Fattoush salad was amazing, fresh and zesty and festooned with those crunchy fried pita chips that I love. Topped with grilled chicken, it would be a meal in itself. The hefty Chicken Shawarma wrap contained several ingredients in addition to the grilled chicken, pickles, and garlic sauce I’m used to: lettuce, tomatoes, and pickled banana peppers.

The banana peppers surprised me! But really, they are in the same vein as pickles with their sour vinegar pop of flavor, so why not?

I perused recipes online while writing this post to see if banana peppers in chicken shawarma dishes is a more widely embraced thing beyond The Pita Peddler’s kitchen, and apparently it is. At any rate, it’s a new concept to me. So thanks, The Pita Peddler, for expanding my horizons!

46610 N. Gratiot Ave.

Chesterfield, MI 48051

www.thepitapeddler.com

342. Baffin Brewing Company – July 23, 2018 – Saint Clair Shores, MI

June2018Baffin1 (2)June2018Baffin3 (2)It’s time to recount leg two of my recent Saint Clair Shores-based brewery tour! Readers of 100 Places in the D, welcome Baffin Brewing Company to the blog!

This brewery tour was admittedly more of a jaunt: a friend and I visited Jamex Brewing Company for the first time and then continued with Baffin Brewing Company on Jefferson Avenue north of 10 Mile Road. But it’s summer, the season for grand adventures, so why not envision a two-brewery-tour as an epic production? When visiting such delightful brewhouses as these two, it’s not hard to do!

Baffin came onto my radar after frequently passing it during my travels around Saint Clair Shores. I’d assumed it had opened within the last year because that’s when I started to notice it and was surprised to recently discover that it opened in early 2015 (Wow, how did I miss that???).

It was obvious that the general Metro-Detroit population had been hip to Baffin for longer than I had: the place was PACKED during the Saturday evening of my visit. It was standing-room-only for us initially.

We approached the bar, preparing to wait for one of the bartenders to notice us, and were pleasantly surprised when a staff member roaming the floor approached us to collect our drink orders. The promptness of being greeted and the convenience of not having to vie for the busy bartenders’ attention made an instant positive impression on me. Well played, Baffin!

I wanted to order a flight so I could sample four of Baffin’s brews, but I was worried about having to juggle the flight paddle whilst standing sans tabletop. The bartender convinced me that I simply had to hold the wooden paddle with the glasses hanging off of it level with one hand so I could select and sample with the other. Sold!

I scanned Baffin’s bar-side menu chalked with its current offerings and decided to try the Mango Unchained IPA, Citra Unchained IPA, Porter De Rosey (a porter infused with rose hips) and James Van Der Kriek (a Belgian brewed with cherry and honey). Then I balanced that flight paddle as carefully as I could and started sampling.

As the sipping and savoring of the brews ensued, I quickly discovered that I LOVED, LOVED, LOVED all of them! All four incorporated fruit and were incredibly drinkable. The Porter De Rosey, that rich, smooth brew infused with the floral flavor of the rose hips, was especially compelling to me.

(BTW, I’m loving Baffin’s beer titles that play off of celebrity names – here’s looking at you, Porter De Rosey, James Van Der Kriek, and Barley Rae Jepsen!)

Eventually, my friend and I no longer had to stand and juggle our beers, because some kind souls who were perched around a barrel fashioned as a table got up to leave and encouraged us to grab it. We sat down, and it was then that we fixated on another one of Baffin’s selling points: the free popcorn.

FREE POPCORN!!! If I wasn’t already in love with Baffin at this point, I most certainly was after discovering the cart of complimentary kernels from which you can serve yourself basketfuls (popcorn is kind of LIFE to me).

Summing up this visit, I can confidently declare: Baffin Brewing Company, leg two of my Saint Clair Shores-based brewery tour, you are AWESOMENESS with your friendly service and your flavorful brews and that sweet, sweet free popcorn. I can’t wait to revisit you!

25113 Jefferson Ave.

St. Clair Shores, MI 48081

www.baffinbrewing.com

341. Jamex Brewing Company – June 23, 2018 – Saint Clair Shores, MI

June2018Jamex2 (2)June2018Jamex1 (2)East Side brewery tour! That’s what one Saturday in late June was for me and my pal Jaclyn after a spontaneous drop-in to Josef’s European Pastry Shop of Grosse Pointe Woods.

I should clarify: this East Side brewery tour was specifically a Saint Clair Shores-based brewery tour. Jamex Brewing Company on Harper Avenue south of Nine Mile Road was our starting point.

The place was hopping with a late-afternoon crowd, including several canines (because Jamex allows dogs!). I immediately dug its welcoming vibe and décor (industrial-chic, with a most stunning turquoise-and-copper-mottled bar counter. Can I get that counter installed in my kitchen, please???).

The female bartender who served us was friendly and conversational, explaining the brewery’s background (it was opened last year by a husband-and-wife entrepreneurial duo who love beer), how often new brews are developed and rotated in (fairly regularly; new recipes are constantly in the works), and how public reception has been (overwhelmingly positive).

As we sat and chatted with her, I tried flight-sized sampler glasses of three of Jamex’s wares: the Joe Blonde (described on the chalkboard menu posted above the bar as a “blonde coffee cream ale”), Bubbalicious IPA, and Harvey Milk dark beer. I enjoyed all of them, especially the Bubbalicious with its fruity flavor and the Harvey Milk with its creamy, stout-esque consistency and hint of sweetness.

My conclusion from leg one of the Saint Clair Shores brewery tour: Jamex is definitely worth a revisit! In perusing its website today, I got excited to see all three beers I tried last month advertised as still on tap. I’d love to go back and savor those or the Lemon Drop brew (intriguing!) currently labeled as “on deck.”

21721 Harper Ave.

St. Clair Shores, MI 48080

www.jamexbrewing.com

337. The Whisky Parlor – June 14, 2018 – Detroit, MI

June2018WhiskyParlor1 (3)June2018WhiskyParlor3 (2)

Thursday night is what The Whisky Parlor has dubbed Lazy Thursday: it showcases live jazz performances from 8 to 10 p.m. Having made it my mission to immerse myself in live music more frequently, I recruited friends to visit the downtown-Detroit-based bar one Thursday a few weeks ago, post dinner at Parc.

Located one floor above the Grand Trunk Pub, which holds a special place in my heart for having been Visit #100 for this blog, The Whisky Parlor exudes old-fashioned elegance.

I dug the dim, cozy environs with its rich red walls, cushy leather couches, hanging globes, and shelves of hard-bound books. A sepia-toned map of the world loomed from one wall and had us dreaming of far-away locales as we sipped our whisky drinks.

Those whisky drinks: they were deliciously nuanced in flavor – and strong (you get your money’s worth here!). I loved The Detroit cocktail with its Old Forester Bourbon, Barrow’s Intense ginger liqueur, Campari, Dolin Rouge vermouth, bitters, black pepper, and what the menu refers to as “torched lemon” (not sure if that’s literally what it sounds like –  a lemon torched by fire being incorporated into the drink – but doesn’t it sound intriguing?). The black pepper was my favorite element of the drink; it wasn’t overpowering, but it was noticeable and provided a nice finish.

The identity of the other signature drink I ordered at The Whisky Parlor has unfortunately faded from my memory. I want to say it was The Great Dane with its Bastille whisky, lemon, Demerara sugar, and Amaro Montenegro, but I can’t be sure at this point. All I can remember is that it was citrusy, served to me sans ice, and quite potent. It was a cocktail that meant business!

While I choose to experience The Whisky Parlor’s offerings via its signature cocktails, the feature of its menu was of course the straight-up stuff: entry after entry of whiskeys, from bourbons to ryes to scotches, from American to Irish to a category labeled “Misc. International.” They ranged in price-point from accessible (Canadian Club, Jack Daniel’s) to upper-echelon ($70 per pour for the Middleton Very Rare 2016 Irish whisky). Beer, wine, hard cider, and other liquors were also on tap, as were a selection of delectable-sounding desserts.

And, of course, there was music on tap on the night of our visit. The songs played were – true to the Lazy Thursday moniker – laid-back and subdued: a man mellowly strummed acoustic guitar while a woman sang lightly. The duo’s style didn’t strike me as jazzy so much as easy-listening-esque – which was fine by me.

It was calming to sit there on a cozy couch in the half-darkness sipping a drink and taking in the soothing tunes. There is no way no one has ever taken a snooze at The Whisky Parlor, and I mean that in the best way; the place is ridiculously relaxing.

My takeaway from my time at The Whisky Parlor is that there is never not a good time of year for a lazy, low-key Thursday night – especially in summer, a season that for me is about slowing down and savoring.

608 Woodward Ave.

Detroit, MI 48226

www.whiskyparlor.com

336. Parc – June 14, 2018 – Detroit, MI

June2018Parc2 (2)June2018Parc1 (2)June2018Parc3 (2) Parc! This gorgeous restaurant featured in today’s post is the 2018 Hour Detroit Restaurant of the Year and is located in the heart of Campus Martius in downtown Detroit – muy impressive creds in my book. Its enchanting ambiance, extremely delicious food, and stellar service made it an absolute pleasure to visit.

Speaking of ambiance: local readers, have you been to Campus Martius lately? That place is kicking! At least, it was on the blue-skied, gorgeous summer night I visited Parc two weeks ago. I’ve passed that area regularly in the last six months, and man, I didn’t realize until this visit that there was that much going on down there. There was a pop-up biergarten and a giant sandbox area for the kids and outdoor seating spilling out from surrounding restaurants, such as Parc, and people climbing into the fountain (a.k.a. one seemingly inebriated man unexplainably lounging in the fountain).

In short, Campus Martius was bustling on that summer’s night in mid-June, and it was exciting to see people of all ages – families with kids, young professionals, folks of the 60-and-over demographic – out and about in the city on an otherwise average Thursday night. It felt like a meeting hub in a major metropolitan city – as it should feel – and made me think, wow, this is a great part of town that I need to spend more time in!

The interior of Parc literally opened up onto this idyllic community-park scene during the time of my visit: portions of the front of the restaurant were sans walls, fitted for the open-air concept. While the interior of the restaurant was gorgeous with its sleek bar and many-windowed walls, I was thrilled for my friends and I to nab the one open table at the time on Parc’s patio, so we could dine alfresco on that perfect summer’s night.

Speaking of dining, let’s get down to discussing the important stuff: the food. Parc’s dinner menu boasts a selection of refined appetizers (Duck Confit Croustillant and Wood-Roasted Oysters with “seaweed butter, bacon, crispy kale and pickled shallots,” for instance – I won’t even pretend to like oysters, but wow, do those ingredient paired with them sound fabulous!), side salads, pastas, and protein-centric dishes featuring such meat and seafood standouts as sea bass and veal loin.

From the pasta section, I chose the Lamb Rigatoni, which was absolutely amazing with its perfectly al dente noodles, ground lamb ragout with diced zucchini, onion, and tomato, and ample chunks of feta. It was meaty, creamy, savory, perfectly memorable deliciousness that I catch myself thinking about every time I picture Parc.

If you are a wine aficionado, you will love Parc’s menu stocked with sophisticated selections from all over the world. I stuck to a glass of the humble rosé that cost $19 for a nine-ounce pour. When it comes to wine, one of my dear loves in life, my palate may have graduated beyond cheap swill, but my wallet still has catching up to do ($10-a-bottle grocery-store wine is kind of my jam here in my early thirties).

This was a special-occasion kind of meal for me at Parc, made even more special by the friendly and sophisticated level of service my friends and I received. Dining here was a thoroughly enjoyable experience. No wonder Parc was named the 2018 Restaurant of the Year by Hour Detroit, that venerable publication whose consistently stand-out recommendations are the reason I decided to take up this whole 100 Places in the D enterprise in the first place.

800 Woodward Ave.

Detroit, MI 48226

www.parcdetroit.com

335. El Barzon – June 12, 2018 – Detroit, MI

June2018ElBarzon4 (2)June2018ElBarzon1 (2)June2018ElBarzon2 (2)Behold, my latest obsession: El Barzon restaurant of Detroit!

Of course this restaurant that serves both Italian and Mexican dishes would pique my interest. How could I go wrong by visiting a place that embraces two of my favorite cuisines – cuisines both centered around the bewitching culinary trifecta of Spice, Sauce, and Cheese? I was immediately enamored with the concept.

I was immediately enamored with El Barzon’s ambiance as well when, on a Tuesday night two weeks ago, I pulled up to the restaurant on Junction Street in Southwest Detroit, this bright beacon with its neat red-brick exterior and abundance of vibrant flowers crammed in window boxes and perched atop the patio wall. I was even more enthused when I saw that the restaurant had its own parking lot to the rear of it (as I’ve previously mentioned on this blog ad nauseam, free lot parking in Detroit is LIFE to me, Ms. Parallel-Parking Phobic).

My friend who accompanied me to El Barzon and I entered the restaurant through the rear entrance into its semi-open-air covered patio. I was thrilled to sit on that patio with its gurgling waterfall, bar back-lit with pink and purple lighting, and tables bedecked with vases of fresh red roses.

Upon being greeted and led to a table, a basket of tortilla chips with two different kinds of salsas was placed before us – illustrating that at least in the complimentary-appetizer sense, El Barzon was promoting Mexican cuisine over Italian. Fine by me – I’m not one to refuse endless chips and salsa!

The menu was a treasure trove of delectable choices. Between both the Italian and Mexican choices, my brain was about to explode in a frenzy of indecision: should I order veal? or enchiladas? or lasagna? Italian or Mexican – Mexican or Italian???

In the end, I went with my gut instinct, and that instinct said to go with Mexican: specifically the steak-filled Enchiladas de Mole Poblano. Enchiladas have never been one to lead me astray.

Upon ordering the enchiladas, our server insisted that I sample the Mole Poblano first to ensure I liked it. Though I’d not tasted the traditional Mexican sauce prior to my visit to El Barzon, I assured him I was confident I would, as I knew it incorporated chocolate, dried chili peppers, and spices such as cinnamon – all ingredients I adored. But he persisted in advising I try the sauce first, and being one who gives high regard to servers’ opinions (I was in their shoes once myself, after all), I assented.

Sampling that Mole Poblano sauce confirmed what I’d suspected: it was rich, flavorful, totally-up-my-alley deliciousness! I could also grasp how it might not suit everyone’s preferences, especially those who are not into richly spiced items or incorporating chocolate into savory dishes.

And the enchiladas themselves! They were wonderful with their tender steak and doused in that decadent mole sauce and topped with sour cream, shredded cheese, and sliced avocado. It’s safe to say that I am steadfastly a Enchiladas de Mole Poblano enthusiast after the experience of consuming El Barzon’s.

While I’d waited for those delectable enchiladas, I’d sipped on one of the restaurant’s signature margaritas, the Jamaica, which was perfect with what the menu refers to as “hibiscus-infused tequila” and a “homemade citrus agave blend” along with triple sec and a salted rim. I’d opted to again defer to the Mexican side of the menu with this drink choice – though I did also peruse El Barzon’s extensive and impressive wine menu.

The magical ambiance and supreme food and drink were enough to label El Barzon a winner in my book; the top-notch service qualified it as a veritable champion. The gentleman who waited on us offered the epitome of prompt, pleasant, professional service, as did the other staff members who we interacted with. Their graceful action added to the elegance of the place.

The restaurant was also wonderfully clean. The ladies’ restroom at the time of my visit was so sparkling that I found myself musing “You could eat off of this restroom floor!” – an assessment wholly atypical of my usual assertion around public restrooms, which in general threaten to trigger my childhood germ phobia more often than not.

As I’ve illustrated here, I cannot rave enough about this place, the beautiful El Barzon! I could keep waxing on about it indefinitely, so let me wrap it up by simply asserting this: it’s a definite gem of the Detroit restaurant scene, and you should definitely visit it if you at all feel compelled to.

3710 Junction St.

Detroit, MI 48210

www.elbarzonrestaurant.com